Stress Solutions

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by Susan Andrews, PhD

APA Study:
Discrimination Leads to Stress

APA has done a survey every year on stress in America. In recent years the Harris Poll survey has focused on discrimination because it is a growing cause of stress. The news has reported numerous clashes between police and black people and Hispanic people. Sadly, there has also been examples of violence based on racial and religious discrimination.

According to an APA study based on a survey of 3,361 adults, more than half of U.S. adults say they have experienced discrimination at the workplace, from police or in other situations. Discrimination was linked to high stress levels and to poor health in those who reported discrimination as compared to the people in the survey who reported not experiencing
discrimination.

The survey respondents reported that their discrimination induced stress has risen over last year. The discrimination has taken the form of poor service, threats, lack of courtesy, lack of
respect shown, among other examples. More than 75% of black people said they experience day-to-day discrimination. Almost one-third of both black and Hispanic adults told the survey that they have become hypervigilant about their appearance in the hope of being treated more fairly.

What the survey does not say is that this type of discrimination-induced stress is chronic stress. Stress that one has little relief from means that the negative effects on one’s health are stronger. Negative effects include excessive fatigue, higher blood pressure readings, reduced immune system protection, among others.

Discrimination-induced stress begs the question of how to reduce such stress. It is pervasive, and its reduction depends upon a major change in people’s beliefs and attitudes. Obviously changes in beliefs and attitudes cannot be legislated. Psychology failed to change even minor beliefs and attitudes about eating organ meat (such as liver) during WW2, such that the more desirable meat could be sent to our troops.

And, when we have no answers or ideas of how to change a situation, it is hard to figure out how to end a column on a more positive note.

 

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